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Public sector consulting

Saint Blanquat & A. provides consulting services targeting the public sector. As a premium local consulting firm, we supply technical assistance to projects that contribute to social, economic and cultural advancement.

Our Public Sector Consulting Business Unit aims to further strengthen collaboration with the Cambodian public sector and international institutions such as the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank (ADB), the French Development Agency, and the EU  through partnering with international consulting firms experienced in large-scale development projects.

We specialize in project management including design, coordination and monitoring and evaluation (M&E). Our gender-sensitive approach underscores our belief that gender equality is key to sustainable development. 

Background information
Cambodia's Development Context Myanmar's Development Context

Our expertise

Relying on a pool of in-house and external consultants, Saint Blanquat & A. Public Sector Consulting Services cover the following fields of expertise:


Our clients

French Development Agency
French Development Agency
Asian Development Bank
Asian Development Bank
Ministry of Health
Cambodian Ministry of Health
Ministry of Agriculture Forestry & Fisheries
Cambodian Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fishery
Ministry of Culture & Fine Arts
Cambodian Ministry of Culture & Fine Arts

Our team

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Sabrina Ouellet

Senior Expert

Sabrina has six years of experience in international development in Cambodia with a focus on project and program design, management, coordination, and monitoring & evaluation in the field of gender (Oxfam), parliamentary strengthening (Parliamentary Institute of Cambodia) and food security and nutrition (WFP).

Our team

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Ollivier Grandjean

Senior Expert

Ollivier is a food and safety expert with 35 years of professional experience in both Europe and Asia. As a manager, he has led operations and ISO and HACCP accreditation at multi-outlet restaurant chains, a food-equipment manufacturer, a large-sized food service and facility management organisation, as well as several catering companies.

Contact us

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Cambodia’s Development Context

Population: 15.76 million (2016, World Bank)

Rural vs. urban population: 79.3% vs. 20.7% of total population (2015)

Main economic sectors: Garment, tourism, construction and real estate, agriculture

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Poverty

Ranking sixth economy in the world, Cambodia has sustained an average growth rate of 7.6% in 1994-2015. In 2014, the poverty rate was 13.5% compared to 47.8% in 2007, with 90% of the poor living in the countryside. While Cambodia has achieved the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) of halving poverty in 2009, the vast majority of families who escaped poverty were only able to do so by a small margin. Around 4.5 million people remain near-poor, vulnerable to falling back into poverty when exposed to economic and other external shocks. (World Bank Cambodia)

Healthcare

Health and education remain both important challenges and development priorities for Cambodia. 32% (or approximately 0.5 million) of children under five are stunted. As of 2015, 70 % of Cambodia’s population (12.3 million people) do not have access to piped water supply, and 58 percent (9.3 million people) do not have access to improved sanitation. Cambodia has made strides in improving maternal health, early childhood development, and primary education in rural areas. The maternal mortality ratio per 100,000 live births decreased from 472 in 2005 to 170 in 2014, the under-five mortality rate decreased from 83 per 1,000 live births in 2005 to 35 per 1,000 in 2014. (World Bank Cambodia)

Education

While net enrollment in primary education increased from 82% in 1997 to 97% in 2016, lower secondary completion rates, at 43% in 2013, are significantly below the average for lower middle-income countries. (World Bank Cambodia)

Outlook

In spite of these achievements, Cambodia still faces a number of development challenges, including the need for good quality public service delivery, inclusive development, better land administration and natural resources management, environmental sustainability, and good governance.

Cambodia’s graduation to the status of Lower-Middle Income nation in 2016 represents an important milestone as the country plans to reach the Upper-Middle Income status by 2030 and the rank of developed country by 2050. In order to meet its aspiration, the country needs to keep directing its actions towards sustainable growth, which entails investing in human capital (health, nutrition, education and skills development) with the continuing support from international and local partners.

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Myanmar’s Development Context

Population: 52.89 million (2016, World Bank)

Rural vs. urban population: 65.4% vs. 34.6% of total population (2016)

Main economic sectors: Agricultural processing, manufacturing, construction, transportation

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Poverty

Myanmar is one of the fastest growing economies in Southeast Asia. Medium-term growth is currently projected to average 7.1% per year, mainly driven by economic reforms, public consumption and private investment. According to the World Bank estimates, poverty rate went from 44.5% in 2004 to 37.5% in 2009/10 and 26.1% in 2015. Nevertheless, households in the rural area remain vulnerable to economic shocks and susceptible to fall back into poverty. (World Bank)

Healthcare

Infant and child mortality are pressing issues: out of every 100 children, 6.2 die before their first birthday and 7.2 before their fifth (Population and Housing Census, 2014). In terms of nutrition data, 29% of children under 5 are moderately stunted and 8% are severely stunted (DHS, 2015).

Education

The dropout rate is high, especially in rural areas where 6 out of 10 children who start grade one drop out before the end of middle school; among the poorest families, this figure is 7 in 10. (World Bank)

Infrastructure

Access to basic infrastructure and services remain a challenge in both rural and urban areas. Only one-third of the population has access to the national electricity grid while road density remains low at 219.8 kilometers per 1,000 square kilometers of land area. However, with the recent liberalization of the telecommunications sector, mobile and internet penetration has increased significantly from less than 20% and 10% in 2014, to 60% and 25% respectively. (World Bank)